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Beer

Milling

The malted barley is crushed in a roller mill to open up the husks and expose the sugars and starches created during the malting process. The crushed grain is then added to another vessel called a Mash Tun.

Mashing

Water (called “Liquor” in brewing) is then added to the crushed barley at between around 65- 68 degrees Centigrade and held for a pre-requisite time to absorb all the sugars from the grain. 

The resultant sugary sweet liquor is now called Wort.

Sparging

After the mash timings are complete, we begin the sparge. This the process of adding more liquor at a slightly higher temperature via fine spray across the top of the grain bed to run through the barley porridge, washing out any remaining sugars (mash out) into the boiler (or Copper).

Boiling

The sugary wort is then raised to a rolling boil which is held typically for at least an hour, sometimes more.

Hop additions.

Hops are added to the boil at various stages to impact different taste results on the wort. First addition or copper hops are typically added for bitterness.

Late addition hops are typically added for flavour and Flame-Out hops are added once the wort has been cooled to at or below 85 degrees C so that the volatile oils won’t evaporate, imparting their aroma into the finished beer depending on the type and amount added.

Beer Range

As a Mini Micro brewery, The HAPPYBREWDAY beer range varies on demand, but the core range comprises of a dry Irish stout Kiss the Black, a traditional Best called Browndog Bitter named after his faithful chocolate Labrador, Rocky.

A hoppy Pale Ale called Trademark Red and his latest design Taskashi Ace a refreshing Japanese style rice lager, a perfect accompaniment to spicy food and hot weather. He also brews a traditional dark mild in memory of his Lancashire roots Mild at Heart

There is often a seasonal selection of individual wheat style fruit beers, On the Razz a raspberry Weiss bier and Fruity Tutti a mango and passion fruit flavoured wheat beer and Burnt Orange Sky an oak aged barley wine

Cooling

The wort is then cooled to around 19 degrees C and transferred to the fermenter. This can be done either over time, or by using a cooling coil (pictured) or an in line plate chiller. 

A hydrometer reading is then taken to measure the starting gravity (SG) of the wort. A second reading is taken some 7 days or so later which will represent the finishing gravity (FG). A calculation between the two figures will then produce an ABV% (alcohol by volume).

Yeast Pitching

Once the wort has been cooled it is transferred to the fermenter from a height creating as much turbulence as possible in order to re-oxygenate. This will help the yeast to re-produce. The yeast can then be pitched in (added) to work it’s magic, eating all the sugars and as a by product producing alcohol and CO2 in the finished beer.

Maturation

The fermenter is then placed in a room (or fermentation chamber) at an ambient temperature of around 20 degrees Centigrade in order for the yeast to work it’s magic over the next 7 days or so.

Carbonation

When bottling beer an extra boost of brewing sugar or DME (dried malt extract) is added to the finished beer to rouse the residual yeast and start a secondary fermentation in the bottle – known as bottle conditioning. 

The amount of priming sugar is calculated and added to the bulk of the beer in the fermenter before bottling begins.

Another method is forced carbonation in bulk storage via a kegging system, in which the beer absorbs the CO2 under pressure in a sealed stainless steel container.

Packaging

Finally the bottles are labelled and date stamped and it’s off to market…….

 

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Core Beer Range

Seasonal Brews

£4.00/500ml at farmers markets

Online purchasing, payment and delivery available soon.

 

Attend Classes

On Brew School days I will provide everything needed and will cover the basics with a practical brewing demonstration using raw grains, hops and basic equipment you can use at home.
The session typically runs between 4 – 5 hours and will include lunch, tea and coffee and an in depth discussion of each part of the process as we brew together.

Please contact for available dates and options.